LINKS:
Richard Nixon- Watergate.info
On August 8, 1974, Richard Nixon became the only United States president to resign from office. The announcement came less than two years after he was re-elected to office in a landslide victory pledging an end to the Vietnam War.
Nixon Presidential Politics - American Experience
POLITICAL FALLOUT
LINKS:
Abandoned in Laos - powfioa.org

Reported To Be Alive - Abandoned In Laos Reflection on POW/MIA Issues from Laos  - Compiled by: Don Moody

The National League of POW/MIA Families  Update:  Sybil Bailey Stockdale 1924-2105.  Sybil Stockdale, the driving force behind the national movement to end the torture and mistreatment of American POW’s in Vietnam and insure that they were able to return home with honor, and wife of Vice Admiral James Bond Stockdale, passed away at the age of 90.

Update August 2014:  On August 26th, JPAC hosted POW/MIA Consultations with the Lao that were not especially significant in terms of results achieved, but important in that views were exchanged, and the US request for renewed cooperation by Laos on archival documents was not rejected.  Little progress was made on other requests by both governments.  The lack of positive Lao responsiveness was somewhat predictable, based on uncertainty within the Lao leadership brought about by the recent untimely death of the Lao Ministers of Defense and Public Security.  Another possible reason was the lack of US dependability on field operations due to budget fluctuations, sequestration and revised JPAC operational plans. Joint Field Activities (JFAs) will resume late this month with five Recovery Teams (RTs), one Investigation Team (IT) and one Research Investigation Team (RIT) conducting a trilateral (LPDR, SRV & US) investigation.  This JFA, expected to conclude in early December, will be the first in a long time to maximize the number of US personnel allowed in-country at one time, i.e. 53.

Perhaps it can all be summed up by a statement made by a former POW:
"I was prepared to fight, to be wounded, to be captured and even prepared to die, but I was not prepared to be abandoned."
CIA Director William Colby
1981 Vint Lawrence describing Long Tieng

LINKS:           
TACAN LS85 CONSTRUCTION - 1st AACS Mobile Communications Group Team 72-66

LIMASITE85- limasite85.us

THE FALL OF LIMA SITE 85 USAF Magazine April 2006

ORGANIZING AND MANAGING UNCONVENTIONAL WAR IN LAOS -  Rand  (Declassified 1980)

FIVE WEEKS AT PHALANE - A glimpse of a bamboo Bastogne  -  Edwin K. Stockinger

AIR OPS IN NORTHERN LAOS PROJECT CHECO  -  Lt. Col.Harry D. Blout

LS-36 THE ALAMO LAOS  -  Edward Marek  (talkingproud.us)

BRIEF HISTORY OF LAOS WAR - Edward Marek (talkproud.us)

A RETROSPECTIVE ON COUNTERINSURGENCY OPERATIONS  -  CIA

TOM POOLE CIA COMMANDER IN LAOS - War Tales

CIA LEGEND KAYAK- Alan Parker

LAOS - A SECRET PILOT WAR - Published March 12, 2011 Heritage Flight Gear Display

AREA HANDBOOK FOR LAOSForeign Area Studies 1971-72 publication for military personnel

LZ CENTER - Myths and Facts about the Vietnam War

LZ CENTER - Top 100 Vietnam War Era Music List 1966-1971 - Turn up the volume & listen to free music

PRESERVING OUR HISTORY/LAOS - Erwin Davis

Map of SE Asia - fac-assoc.org

VIETNAM WAR WEBSOURCES

YouTube upload by Noah Vang
The following videos and links are provided to help understand the political climate that led to the covert war, the casualties, consequences and impact on Laos and it's people. 
Double click any video for full screen.
NBC Reporter Ted Yates documentary
Trailer for PBS documentary.  May 1975 during the fall of Long Tieng, General Vang Pao, his family and top officials were safely airlifted out.
The National Archives presents the Pentagon Papers, a 7000 page official government report, into 48 manageable PDF files for easy reference.
Laos was the most heavily bombed country in the world.  
The equivalent of one B-52 bomb load was dropped every 8 minutes 24/7 for nine years. The aftermath: unexploded ordnance littering the countryside.
WARNING: VIEWER DISCRETION IS ADVISED
VIDEO'S MAY CONTAIN DISTURBING IMAGES OF WAR
April 24, 1963 JFK News Conference on Laos
March 23, 1961 JFK Speech on Laos
CBS Chief Correspondent, Charles Collingwood 1969 Report on Laos
(available on dvd from National Archives sold through Amazon)
SECRET WAR IN LAOS

T-28 Trojan Foundation

CIA op Dick Holm in Laos with Hmong fighter
RECOMMENDED BOOKS
      (click on book covers)
Vietnam Zippos:  American Soldiers' Engravings and Stories 1965-1973
- by Bradford Edwards
THE AFTERMATH
SULLIVAN'S WAR
The CIA was largely responsible for conducting military operations in Laos, but the US Ambassador was the man in charge. The secret war in Laos, was often quoted as "William Sullivan's War."  Ambassador to Laos from December 1964 to March 1969, Sullivan insisted on an efficient, closely controlled country team. "There wasn't a bag of rice dropped in Laos that he didn't know about," observed Assistant Secretary of State William Bundy. Sullivan imposed two conditions upon his subordinates. First, the thin fiction of the Geneva accords had to be maintained to avoid possible embarrassment to the Lao and Soviet Governments; military operations, therefore, had to be carried out in relative secrecy. Second, no regular US ground troops were to become involved.  (William H. Sullivan died October 11, 2013, he was 90)  

SULLIVAN'S "LACK" OF WAR
Truth be told, for those that were in Laos during Sullivan's tenure knew "he was more motivated by his own sometimes cocked eye opinions and had no interest in seeing allied objectives achieved in Laos.  He did not grieve the loss of American men lost nor did he acknowledge their life giving commitments to their efforts to keep Laos and Vietnam free."  He left a bitter impression.  For the full story, click here: muleorations.com.
General Westmoreland did not approve of Sullivan's authority in Laos, which Sullivan declared at one point that "divided authority over the Laotian air war could end only if the President either gave Sullivan command of MACSOG or appointed Westmoreland Ambassador to Laos."

President Kennedy March 23, 1961
THE COVERT WAR
Surrogate warfare in Laos, recently declassified
Helen Murphy © 2009-2017   All Rights Reserved
LINKS:
After the war, thousands of Hmong fled to Thailand refugee camps.  In 2009 Thailand ordered them repatriated.

Laos Hmong Refugee Crisis - Center for Public Policy Analysis (CPPA)

Laos Farming in Safety - Mining Advisory Group (MAG)

Hmongculture.net - Insight into Hmong culture in the U.S.

Center for Hmong Studies- Academic resource for students, scholars and community members
To this day the Hmong are still persecuted and hunted down
1971 Sen. Mike Gravel releases  first collection 
of the Pentagon Papers to the public. 
DISCLAIMER

The material available on this website is designed to provide information only. The webmaster has made every effort to ensure that these pages are accurate. The information and statements are believed to be correct, and are offered in good faith and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the T28TrojanFoundation.  The T28TrojanFoundation and the webmaster shall not be liable for any information represented by other sources and cannot accept responsibility for information contained in sites which we refer to by providing external links. We provide those links in order that you can do your own research and believe that the sites to which we provide such links are accurate and truthful but the contents of all such sites remain the responsibility of the organizations or individuals who maintain those sites. 
    
   

 
"The big secret that American military people were in Laos was not a secret from the Soviets, the Chinese, nor the North Vietnamese - it was a secret from the American public" - Raven Craig Morrison
NOT ALL THAT SECRET

The year 1965 marked the beginning of major military activity in what became
known as the secret war in Laos. Although the full extent of the conflict was not
revealed to the American people until 1969-70, the war was not all that secret.
News of the fighting frequently found its way into the pages of The Bangkok
Post, The New York Times, and other newspapers. Congress was kept well
informed. As former CIA Director Richard Helms has pointed out, the Appropriations subcommittees that provided the funds for the war were briefed regularly. Also, Senator Stuart Symington and other Congressmen visited Laos and gave every indication of approving what was happening. They believed, Helms noted, that "It was a much cheaper and better way to fight a war in Southeast Asia than to commit American troops." 


THE POLITICAL CLIMATE